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SPRING/SUMMER EXHIBITIONS LAUNCH

Friday 27 April 2018
Members’ Preview: 5–6 pm
Public Reception: 6–7:30 pm

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Celebrate five new exhibitions at the Agnes’s Spring Season Launch on Friday 27 April: Artists at Work: Picturing Practice in European Tradition; Chris Kline and Yam Lau: Weave; Charles F. Gibson: Events of a Military Life in Kingston; Gabrielle Kilian Sims: Hook and The Art of African Ivory.


ARTISTS AT WORK

The artistic process—from the initial spark to the triumphant final burst of effort—and the mystique surrounding “the artist” have long captivated viewers, collectors and scholars. With the elevation of fine art from craft to liberal art in the Renaissance, a desire was fostered for images, including self-portraits and studio views, in which the act of invention is at the fore.

Artists at Work: Picturing Practice in the European Tradition explores the physical and intellectual aspects of the creative process established in Europe in the late Renaissance. Grounded in the Agnes’s collection of historical European art and extended by select Canadian historical works, this show highlights paintings and works on paper from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries that present the act of artmaking as challenging, moving, and gloriously enriching.

This exhibition is on view through 2 December 2018.


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CHRIS KLINE AND YAM LAU: WEAVE

“The taut thread…was the precursor of the drawn line of architectural design, whose straightness was compared to that of a ray of light. Sixteenth-century treatises on perspective even depicted sight lines as lines of tightly stretched thread, but with loose ends that betrayed their nature.” —Tim Ingold

Canadian artists Chris Kline and Yam Lau present Weave, a two-person exhibition that reflects precise collusion with material fields of force. In this unusual pairing, the artists’s respective works find surprising affinities: Kline’s tender and rigorous hand-coloured paintings contrast with Lau’s gliding cinematic movements through simulated space, but both artists are intimately involved with the crossings of idea and substance, being and becoming, and memory and form, especially as woven through or across screens. Here, screens shift between withholding and revealing, as they layer and disclose unfolding intricacies.

Weave is co-curated by Stephen Horne and Sunny Kerr, and will be on view through 5 August 2018.


EVENTS OF A MILITARY LIFE IN KINGSTON

While stationed in Kingston as an Ensign in 1831–1833, Charles Frederick Gibson painted the landscape and activities around him, during an exciting time of change. This exhibition features his Kingston watercolours and drawings—including recent Agnes additions and loans from other collections—alongside works by other contemporary artists, such as Lieutenant Edward Charles Frome, Sir Richard Henry Bonnycastle and Harriet Dobbs Cartwright. Through Gibson’s eyes, we experience Kingston of the 1830s as events of a military life unfold, including a cholera epidemic, the construction of the Rideau Canal and the re-building of Fort Henry.

Charles F. Gibson: Events of a Military Life in Kingston will be on view until 5 August 2018.

A richly illustrated publication with an essay by the exhibition’s curator, Susan M. Bazely, will be launched with the exhibition.


GABRIELLE KILIAN SIMS: HOOK

Hook, on view until 5 August, gathers a poignant selection of Gabrielle Kilian Sims’s recent drawings. Figurative works in charcoal and ink, they are charged with the anguish of grief and explore the feelings of dread, outrage and tenderness compelled by conditions of entanglement and loss.

Gabrielle Kilian Sims lives and works in Kingston. Her art has been exhibited in Canada, United States, Europe and Qatar and is held in public collections including the Canada Council Art Bank and the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.


THE ART OF AFRICAN IVORY

Africans have traded raw and carved ivory for centuries. Dignitaries in Africa and Europe commissioned African artists to create elegant works, and merchants financed its transport across deserts and oceans. Its lustrous sheen makes it desirable, as does the majesty of its source: African elephants are the world’s largest. Across continents, ivory objects are used in rites of prestige and pageantry rolled into one. Desired by numerous bodies—political, social, medicinal, religious—ivory sparks discussion of history and debates about ecological and wildlife preservation.

The Art of African Ivory showcases works donated by Justin and Elisabeth Lang, that are, generally, small in form but big in content. Visitors will discover how Africans have used ivory to teach morality, convey social standing, heal wounds, safeguard communities and profit commercially. This exhibition is curated by Dr Shannen Hill and will be on view through 12 April 2020.


CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

To 5 August 2018: Log Cabin: A Canadian Quilt



The Agnes Etherington Art Centre is a platform for teaching and learning at Queen's University that also serves as Southeastern Ontario’s public art museum.

For further information, contact Kate Yüksel at (613) 533.2190 or kate.yuksel@queensu.ca.

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Agnes Etherington Art Centre
36 University Avenue, Queen’s University
Kingston, ON K7L 3N6
www.agnes.queensu.ca
Facebook: aeartcentre
Twitter: @aeartcentre
Instagram: @aeartcentre

Agnes Etherington Art Centre is an accessible venue, more details can be found here.


Image: Unknown, Self-Portrait with Square Palette, around 1600, oil on panel. Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 2014 (57-001.04). Photo: Bernard Clark. From the exhibition Artists at Work: Picturing Practice in the European Tradition.

Image: Yam Lau, Rotation: In the texture of the world, 2018, video still. Collection of the artist. From the exhibition, Chris Kline and Yam Lau: Weave.


THE AGNES THANKS Queen’s University, the Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Kingston Arts Fund through the Kingston Arts Council, Ontario Arts Foundation, Government of Canada, and Lloyd Carr-Harris Foundation, along with funds held at Queen’s University, including: The Bader Legacy Fund, David and Patti Bain Memorial Fund, Janet Braide Memorial Fund, Celebrating Agnes Fund, Franks Fund, Rita Friendly Kaufman Fund, Justin and Elisabeth Lang Fund, David McTavish Art Study Fund, Chancellor Richardson Memorial Fund, George Taylor Richardson Memorial Fund, John L. Russell and Gerald Brenner Fund, Iva Speers Fund for Art Education, and Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts Fund. We are grateful for the crucial ongoing support of our members, and corporate and private donors.

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